PHP 7.0.6 Released

La précédence des opérateurs

La priorité des opérateurs spécifie l'ordre dans lequel les valeurs doivent être analysées. Par exemple, dans l'expression 1 + 5 * 3, le résultat est 16 et non 18, car la multiplication ("*") a une priorité supérieure par rapport à l'addition ("+"). Des parenthèses peuvent être utilisées pour forcer la priorité, si nécessaire. Par exemple : (1 + 5) * 3 donnera 18.

Lorsque les opérateurs ont une précédence égale, leur association décide la façon dont les opérateurs sont groupés. Par exemple, "-" est une association par la gauche, ainsi 1 - 2 - 3 est groupé comme ceci (1 - 2) - 3 et sera évalué à -4. D'un autre côté, "=" est une association par la droite, ainsi, $a = $b = $c est groupé comme ceci $a = ($b = $c).

Les opérateurs de précédence égale qui ne sont pas associatifs, ne peuvent pas être utilisés entre eux, par exemple, 1 < 2 > 1 est interdit en PHP. L'expression 1 <= 1 == 1 par contre, est autorisée, car l'opérateur == a une précédence inférieure que l'opérateur <=.

L'utilisation des parenthèses, y compris lorsqu'elles ne sont pas nécessaires, permet de mieux lire le code en effectuant des groupements explicites plutôt qu'imaginer la précédence des opérateurs et leurs associations.

Le tableau qui suit liste les opérateurs par ordre de précédence, avec la précédence la plus élevée en haut. Les opérateurs sur la même ligne ont une précédence équivalente (donc l'associativité décide du groupement).

Précédence des opérateurs
Associativité Opérateurs Information additionnelle
non-associative clone new clone et new
gauche [ array()
droite ** arithmétique
droite ++ -- ~ (int) (float) (string) (array) (object) (bool) @ types et incrément/décrément
non-associatif instanceof types
droite ! logique
gauche * / % arithmétique
gauche + - . arithmétique et chaîne de caractères
gauche << >> bitwise
non-associatif < <= > >= comparaison
non-associatif == != === !== <> comparaison
gauche & bitwise et références
gauche ^ bitwise
gauche | bitwise
gauche && logique
gauche || logique
gauche ? : ternaire
droite = += -= *= **= /= .= %= &= |= ^= <<= >>= => affectation
gauche and logique
gauche xor logique
gauche or logique
gauche , plusieurs utilisations

Exemple #1 Associativité

<?php
$a 
5// (3 * 3) % 5 = 4
// L'association des opérateurs ternaires diffère de C/C++
$a true true 2// (true ? 0 : true) ? 1 : 2 = 2

$a 1;
$b 2;
$a $b += 3// $a = ($b += 3) -> $a = 5, $b = 5
?>

La précédence et l'association de l'opérateur ne détermine que la façon dont les expressions sont groupées ; ils ne spécifient pas l'ordre de l'évaluation. PHP ne spécifie pas (de manière générale) l'ordre dans lequel une expression est évaluée et le code qui suppose un ordre spécifique d'évaluation ne devrait pas exister, car le comportement peut changer entre les différentes versions de PHP ou suivant le code environnant.

Exemple #2 Ordre d'évaluation indéfini

<?php
$a 
1;
echo 
$a $a++; // peut afficher 2 ou 3

$i 1;
$array[$i] = $i++; // peut définir l'index 1 ou 2
?>

Note:

Bien que = soit prioritaire sur la plupart des opérateurs, PHP va tout de même exécuter des expressions comme : if (!$a = foo()). Dans cette situation, le résultat de foo() sera placé dans la variable $a.

add a note add a note

User Contributed Notes 9 notes

up
58
Antistone
2 years ago
BEWARE:  Addition, subtraction, and string concatenation have equal precedence!
<?
$x
= 4;
echo
"x minus one equals " . $x-1 . ", or so I hope";
?>
will print "-1, or so I hope"

(Concatenate the first string literal and the value of $x, then implicitly convert that to a number (zero) so you can subtract 1 from it, then concatenate the final string literal.)
up
26
fabmlk
11 months ago
Watch out for the difference of priority between 'and vs &&' or '|| vs or':
<?php
$bool
= true && false;
var_dump($bool); // false, that's expected

$bool = true and false;
var_dump($bool); // true, ouch!
?>
Because 'and/or' have lower priority than '=' but '||/&&' have higher.
up
5
karlisd at gmail dot com
5 months ago
Sometimes it's easier to understand things in your own examples.
If you want to play around operator precedence and look which tests will be made, you can play around with this:

<?php
function F($v) {echo $v." "; return false;}
function
T($v) {echo $v." "; return true;}

IF (
F(0) || T(1) && F(2)  || F(3)  && ! F(4) ) {
  echo
"true";
} else echo
" false";
?>
Now put in IF arguments f for false and t for true, put in them some ID's. Play out by changing "F" to "T" and vice versa, by keeping your ID the same. See output and you will know which arguments  actualy were checked.
up
8
nicoolasens at gmail dot com
6 months ago
Too add something ton Antistone's comment :
{Antistone ¶
1 year ago
BEWARE:  Addition, subtraction, and string concatenation have equal precedence!
<?
$x
= 4;
echo
"x minus one equals " . $x-1 . ", or so I hope";
?>
will print "-1, or so I hope"

(Concatenate the first string literal and the value of $x, then implicitly convert that to a number (zero) so you can subtract 1 from it, then concatenate the final string literal.)
}

You can use the operator "," instead of ".".
This way allows you to concatenate the first string literal after $x-1.
So the first string literal is note convert to a number (zero) .
Solution :

<?php
$x
= 4;
echo
"x minus one equals " , $x-1 . ", or so I hope";
?>

will print :
"x minus one equals 3, or so I hope "
up
25
Carsten Milkau
3 years ago
Beware the unusual order of bit-wise operators and comparison operators, this has often lead to bugs in my experience. For instance:

<?php if ( $flags & MASK  == 1) do_something(); ?>

will not do what you might expect from other languages. Use

<?php if (($flags & MASK) == 1) do_something(); ?>

in PHP instead.
up
5
headden at karelia dot ru
6 years ago
Although example above already shows it, I'd like to explicitly state that ?: associativity DIFFERS from that of C++. I.e. convenient switch/case-like expressions of the form

$i==1 ? "one" :
$i==2 ? "two" :
$i==3 ? "three" :
"error";

will not work in PHP as expected
up
2
Bilal Mustafa
14 days ago
Another way to sort out the problem mentioned by "nicoolasens at gmail dot com" and "Antistone" is:

<?php
$x
= 4;
echo
"x minus one equals " . $x-1 . ", or so I hope";
?>
will print "-1, or so I hope"

Solution:

We can wrap the methematical part in "()" and let the parser tell to solve it first in other words here we can get the benefit of higher precedence of "()" So if we rewrite the example as:

<?php
$x
= 4;
echo
"x minus one equals " . ($x-1) . ", or so I hope";
?>

The answer will be according to our expectation which is:

"x minus one equals 3, or so I hope"
up
1
leipie at gmail dot com
2 years ago
The precedence of the arrow operator (->) on objects seems to the highest of all, even higher then clone.

But you can't wrap (clone $foo)->bar() like this!
up
-1
Anonymous
11 months ago
The following example will output false
$a = 1;
$b = 1;

$c = $a + $a++;
$d = 1 + $b++;

if($c == $d){
    echo 'true';
}else{
    echo 'false';
}
To Top