PHP 5.6.29 Released

list

(PHP 4, PHP 5, PHP 7)

listAsignar variables como si fueran un array

Descripción

array list ( mixed $var1 [, mixed $... ] )

Al igual que array(), no es realmente una función, es un constructor del lenguaje. list() se utiliza para asignar una lista de variables en una sola operación.

Nota:

list() solo funciona con arrays numéricos y supone que los índices numéricos empiezan en 0.

Advertencia

En PHP 5, list() asigna los valores empezando desde el parámetro más a la derecha. En PHP 7, list() empieza desde el parámetro más a la izquierda.

Si se emplean variables simples, esto no debería ser un problema. Pero se en emplean arrays con índices, normalmente se espera que el orden de los índices sea el mismo que el escrito en list(), de izquierda a derecha, no siendo este el caso en PHP 5, ya que se asignan en orden inverso.

En términos generales, se aconseja evitar depender de un orden específico de operación debido a que este podría cambiar de nuevo en el futuro.

Advertencia

La modificación del array durante la ejecución de list() (p.ej. usando list($a, $b) = $b) resultará en un comportamiento indefinido.

Parámetros

var1

Una variable.

Valores devueltos

Devuelve el array asignado.

Ejemplos

Ejemplo #1 Ejemplos de list()

<?php

$info 
= array('café''marrón''cafeína');

// Enumerar todas las variables
list($bebida$color$energía) = $info;
echo 
"El $bebida es $color y la $energía lo hace especial.\n";

// Enumerar algunas de ellas
list($bebida, , $energía) = $info;
echo 
"El $bebida tiene $energía.\n";

// U omitir solo la tercera
list( , , $energía) = $info;
echo 
"Necesito $energía!\n";

// list() no funciona con cadenas
list($bar) = "abcde";
var_dump($bar); // NULL
?>

Ejemplo #2 Un ejemplo del uso de list()

<table>
 <tr>
  <th>Nombre del empleado</th>
  <th>Salario</th>
 </tr>

<?php

$resultado 
$pdo->query("SELECT id, nombre, salario FROM empleados");
while (list(
$id$nombre$salario) = $resultado->fetch(PDO::FETCH_NUM)) {
    echo 
" <tr>\n" .
          
"  <td><a href=\"info.php?id=$id\">$nombre</a></td>\n" .
          
"  <td>$salario</td>\n" .
          
" </tr>\n";
}

?>

</table>

Ejemplo #3 Empleo de list() anidados

<?php

list($a, list($b$c)) = array(1, array(23));

var_dump($a$b$c);

?>
int(1)
int(2)
int(3)

Ejemplo #4 Uso de list() con índices de array

<?php

$info 
= array('café''marrón''cafeína');

list(
$a[0], $a[1], $a[2]) = $info;

var_dump($a);

?>

Muestra la siguiente salida (nótese el orden de los elementos comparado con el orden escrito en la sintaxis de list()):

array(3) {
  [2]=>
  string(8) "cafeína"
  [1]=>
  string(7) "marrón"
  [0]=>
  string(5) "café"
}

Ejemplo #5 list() y orden de definiciones de índices

El orden en el que están definidos los índices de los arrays que consume list() es irrelevante.

<?php
$foo 
= array(=> 'a''foo' => 'b'=> 'c');
$foo[1] = 'd';
list(
$x$y$z) = $foo;
var_dump($foo$x$y$z);

Da el siguiente resultado (observe el orden de los elementos comparado con el orden en el que están escritos en la sintaxis de list()):

array(4) {
  [2]=>
  string(1) "a"
  ["foo"]=>
  string(1) "b"
  [0]=>
  string(1) "c"
  [1]=>
  string(1) "d"
}
string(1) "c"
string(1) "d"
string(1) "a"

Ver también

  • each() - Devolver el par clave/valor actual de un array y avanzar el cursor del array
  • array() - Crea un array
  • extract() - Importar variables a la tabla de símbolos actual desde un array

add a note add a note

User Contributed Notes 12 notes

up
54
chris at chlab dot ch
4 years ago
The example states the following:
<?php
// list() doesn't work with strings
list($bar) = "abcde";
var_dump($bar);
// output: NULL
?>

If the string is in a variable however, it seems using list() will treat the string as an array:
<?php
$string
= "abcde";
list(
$foo) = $string;
var_dump($foo);
// output: string(1) "a"
?>
up
38
megan at voices dot com
3 years ago
As noted, list() will give an error if the input array is too short. This can be avoided by array_merge()'ing in some default values. For example:

<?php
$parameter
= 'name';
list(
$a, $b ) = array_merge( explode( '=', $parameter ), array( true ) );
?>

However, you will have to array_merge with an array long enough to ensure there are enough elements (if $parameter is empty, the code above would still error).

An alternate approach would be to use array_pad on the array to ensure its length (if all the defaults you need to add are the same).

<?php
    $parameter
= 'bob-12345';
    list(
$name, $id, $fav_color, $age ) = array_pad( explode( '-', $parameter ), 4, '' );
   
var_dump($name, $id, $fav_color, $age);
/* outputs
string(3) "bob"
string(5) "12345"
string(0) ""
string(0) ""
*/
?>
up
36
svennd
3 years ago
The list() definition won't throw an error if your array is longer then defined list.
<?php

list($a, $b, $c) = array("a", "b", "c", "d");

var_dump($a); // a
var_dump($b); // b
var_dump($c); // c
?>
up
10
pemapmodder1970 at gmail dot com
10 months ago
list() can be used with foreach

<?php
$array
= [[1, 2], [3, 4], [5, 6]];

foreach(
$array as list($odd, $even)){
    echo
"$odd is odd; $even is even", PHP_EOL;
}
?>

The output:
===
1 is odd; 2 is even
3 is odd; 4 is even
5 is odd; 6 is even
up
17
grzeniufication
2 years ago
The example showing that:

$info = array('kawa', 'brązowa', 'kofeina');
list($a[0], $a[1], $a[2]) = $info;
var_dump($a);

outputs:
array(3) {
[2]=>
string(8) "kofeina"
[1]=>
string(5) "brązowa"
[0]=>
string(6) "kawa"
}

One thing to note here is that if you define the array earlier, e.g.:
$a = [0, 0, 0];

the indexes will be kept in the correct order:

array(3) {
  [0]=>
  string(4) "kawa"
  [1]=>
  string(8) "brązowa"
  [2]=>
  string(7) "kofeina"
}

Thought that it was worth mentioning.
up
3
Colin Guthrie
1 year ago
If you want use the undefined behaviour as you might expect it e.g. if you want:

  $b = ['a','b']; list($a, $b) = $b;

to result in $a=='a' and $b=='b', then you can just cast $b to an array (even although it already is) to create a copy. e.g.

  $b = ['a','b']; list($a, $b) = (array)$b;

and get the expected results.
up
9
john at jbwalker dot com
3 years ago
The list construct seems to look for a sequential list of indexes rather taking elements in sequence. What that obscure statement means is that if you unset an element, list will not simply jump to the next element and assign that to the variable but will treat the missing element as a null or empty variable:

    $test = array("a","b","c","d");
    unset($test[1]);
    list($a,$b,$c)=$test;
    print "\$a='$a' \$b='$b' \$c='$c'<BR>";

results in:
$a='a' $b='' $c='c'

not:
$a='a' $b='c' $c='d'
up
2
vickyssj7 at gmail dot com
2 years ago
if we assign array's each value individual key('numeric only'), and use the array indices in list(),, then it output the reverse order of array keys--
BUT THE HIGHER KEY VALUE ("2" in this e.g below) WILL GET THE FIRST PLACE IN THE ARRAY IN RETURN, MEANS IT PUSHES THE VALUE WITH HIGHER KEY IN PLACE OF FIRST KEY VALUE, so it also gives higher key value the first priority while reversing the order of the keys and replacing the lower key value with the higher key value.

        $value = array( 0 => 'low', 2 => 'medium', 1 => 'higher');
        list($a[2], $a[1], $a[0]) = $value;
    var_dump($a);

//Outputs:---
array(3) {
            [0] => string(6) "medium"
            [1]  => string(6) "higher"
            [2]  => string(3) "low"
}
up
2
anthony dot ossent at live dot fr
1 month ago
a simple example of use to swap two variables :

$a = 'hello';
$b = 'world';

list($a, $b) = [$b, $a];

echo $a . ' ' . $b; //display "world hello"

another example :

function getPosition($x, $y, $z)
{
   // ... some operations like $x++...
   return [$x, $y, $z];
}

list($x, $y, $z) = getPosition($x ,$y, $z);
up
0
Dean
11 months ago
UNDOCUMENTED BEHAVIOR:

    list($a,$b,$c) = null;

in fact works like:

    $a = null; $b = null; $c = null;

...So correspondingly:

    list($rows[]) = null;

Will increment count($rows), just as if you had executed $rows[] = null;

Watch out for this (for example) when retrieving entire tables from a database, e.g.

    while (list($rows[]) = $mysqlresult->fetch_row());

This will leave an extra 'null' entry as the last element of $rows.
up
-10
Achilles at thegreatwarrior dot com
3 years ago
Second, when you’re using the list() function, you must acknowledge each array element. You could not do this
list($weekday, $month) = $date;

But you can use empty values to ignore elements:
list ($weekday, , $month) = $date;
up
-6
mogwai512
1 year ago
I see many people offer solutions about the flipped order of the list construct. All you have to do is this:

<?php

$info
= array('coffee', 'brown', 'caffeine');

$a = list($a[0], $a[1], $a[2]) = $info;

var_dump($a);

?>

. . . and your info will be in the correct order. You can also just assign a new var to the list and it will still work:

<?php

$info
= array('coffee', 'brown', 'caffeine');

$b = list($a[0], $a[1], $a[2]) = $info;

var_dump($b);

?>
To Top