PHP 5.4.31 Released

get_called_class

(PHP 5 >= 5.3.0)

get_called_classthe "Late Static Binding" class name

Beschreibung

string get_called_class ( void )

Gets the name of the class the static method is called in.

R├╝ckgabewerte

Returns the class name. Returns FALSE if called from outside a class.

Beispiele

Beispiel #1 Using get_called_class()

<?php

class foo {
    static public function 
test() {
        
var_dump(get_called_class());
    }
}

class 
bar extends foo {
}

foo::test();
bar::test();

?>

Das oben gezeigte Beispiel erzeugt folgende Ausgabe:

string(3) "foo"
string(3) "bar"

Siehe auch

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User Contributed Notes 7 notes

up
4
danbettles at yahoo dot co dot uk
5 years ago
It is possible to write a completely self-contained Singleton base class in PHP 5.3 using get_called_class.

<?php

abstract class Singleton {

    protected function
__construct() {
    }

    final public static function
getInstance() {
        static
$aoInstance = array();

       
$calledClassName = get_called_class();

        if (! isset (
$aoInstance[$calledClassName])) {
           
$aoInstance[$calledClassName] = new $calledClassName();
        }

        return
$aoInstance[$calledClassName];
    }

    final private function
__clone() {
    }
}

class
DatabaseConnection extends Singleton {

    protected
$connection;

    protected function
__construct() {
       
// @todo Connect to the database
   
}

    public function
__destruct() {
       
// @todo Drop the connection to the database
   
}
}

$oDbConn = new DatabaseConnection();  // Fatal error

$oDbConn = DatabaseConnection::getInstance();  // Returns single instance
?>
up
4
uebele
3 years ago
SEE: http://php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.late-static-bindings.php

I think it is worth mentioning on this page, that many uses of the value returned by get_called_function() could be handled with the new use of the old keyword static, as in
<?php
static::$foo;
?>

versus
<?php
$that
=get_called_class();
$that::$foo;
?>

I had been using $that:: as my conventional replacement for self:: until my googling landed me the url above.  I have replaced all uses of $that with static with success both as
<?php
static::$foo; //and...
new static();
?>

Since static:: is listed with the limitation: "Another difference is that static:: can only refer to static properties." one may still need to use a $that:: to call static functions; though I have not yet needed this semantic.
up
2
php at itronic dot at
4 years ago
If you call a static getInstance() function to create a instance of a class from another class, this function have to be static, if it is not static the original name of the caller class and not of the current class get returned.

example:

<?php

class a {
  function
getXName() {
     return
x::getClassName();
  }
  function
getXStaticName() {
     return
x::getStaticClassName();
  }

}

class
b extends a {
}

class
x {
  public function
getClassName() {
    return
get_called_class();
  }
  public static function
getStaticClassName() {
    return
get_called_class();
  }
}

$a = new a();

$b = new b();

echo
$a->getXName(); // will return "a"
echo $b->getXName(); // will return "b"

echo $a->getXStaticName(); // will return "x"
echo $b->getXStaticName(); // will return "x"

?>
up
0
luc at s dot illi dot be
1 year ago
get_called_class() in closure-scopes:

<?PHP
   
ABSTRACT CLASS Base
   
{
        protected static
$stub = ['baz'];
       
       
//final public function boot()
       
static public function boot()
        {
            print
__METHOD__.'-> '.get_called_class().PHP_EOL;
           
           
array_walk(static::$stub, function()
            {
                print
__METHOD__.'-> '.get_called_class().PHP_EOL;
            });
        }
       
        public function
__construct()
        {
           
self::boot();
            print
__METHOD__.'-> '.get_called_class().PHP_EOL;
           
           
array_walk(static::$stub, function()
            {
                print
__METHOD__.'-> '.get_called_class().PHP_EOL;
            });
        }
    }
   
    CLASS
Sub EXTENDS Base
   
{
    }
   
   
// static boot
       
Base::boot(); print PHP_EOL;
           
// Base::boot        -> Base
            // Base::{closure}    -> Base
           
       
Sub::boot(); print PHP_EOL;
           
// Base::boot        -> Sub
            // Base::{closure}    -> Base
           
       
new sub;
           
// Base::boot        -> Sub
            // Base::{closure}    -> Base
            // Base->__construct    -> Sub
            // Base->{closure}    -> Sub
   
    // instance boot
       
new sub;
           
// Base->boot        -> Sub
            // Base->{closure}    -> Sub
            // Base->__construct    -> Sub
            // Base->{closure}    -> Sub
?>
up
0
a dot cudbard-bell at sussex dot ac dot uk
5 years ago
Here's a simple way of getting the inheritance tree of a class, no matter which class the function was actually defined in. Will work as a static function method too.

<?php
class A {
    public function
get_class_tree(){
       
$cur_class = get_called_class();
        do {
            echo
$cur_class;           
        }
        while(
$cur_class = get_parent_class($cur_class));
    }
}

class
B {

}

class
C {

}

$foo = new C();
$foo->get_class_tree();

?>

CBA
up
-1
Abhi Beckert
4 years ago
Beware that this does not behave as expected if your method is not declared as static! For example:

<?php

class foo {
  static public function
test() {
   
var_dump(get_called_class());
  }
 
  public function
testTwo() {
   
var_dump(get_called_class());
  }
}

class
bar extends foo {
}

class
abc {
  function
test() {
   
foo::test();
   
bar::test();
  }
 
  function
testTwo() {
   
foo::testTwo();
   
bar::testTwo();
  }
}

echo
"basic\n";
foo::test();
bar::test();

echo
"basic without static declaration\n";
foo::testTwo();
bar::testTwo();

echo
"in a class\n";
$abc = new abc();
$abc->test();

echo
"in a class without static declaration\n";
$abc->testTwo();

?>

The result is:

basic
string 'foo'
string 'bar'

basic without static declaration
string 'foo'
string 'bar'

in a class
string 'foo'
string 'bar'

in a class without static declaration
string 'abc'
string 'abc'
up
-3
webmaster at easy-coding dot de
4 years ago
if you cannot avoid that carriage return characters will be used as windows linebreaks, you should set

<?php ini_set("auto_detect_line_endings", 1); ?>

otherwise the solutions posted here will fail.
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